Study Guide

Hiccup!

Welcome to our Hiccup study guide. This guide tells you everything you need to know about the show and includes activities linked to the Australian curriculum. Happy learning!

The general capabilities are embedded within specific learning activities and can be identified with the following icons:

Synopsis

One balmy outback night, a sleep deprived camper, a cheeky quokka and an emu with a penchant for creating wild inventions, awake to discover that a koala has come down with a stubborn (and very loud) case of the hiccups. The three partake in an epic showdown that sees them frantically eat, sing and invent their way towards a cure before the sun comes up.

Coming to the show

Given that this may be many students first performance experience, it is important to talk about the protocols of attending the theatre.

Before the show you can:

  • Ask about their experiences watching live performances (watching older siblings in a school concert, going to a concert, i.e. the Wiggles etc.)
  • Share the journey with them, talk about their thoughts and feelings relating to the production
  • Talk about going to a special theatre space.
  • Explain that a performance usually finishes with clapping.
  • Talk about being an audience member. Explain that audiences are an important part of the performance. In this performance they will be invited to help the performers through movement.
  • Ask questions. What is the role of an audience? What happens during the performance? What can you do in your lounge when you are watching television that you cannot do in the theatre?
  • Talk about the various roles within a theatrical production; from the actors to the lighting technician to the front of house staff. Talk about which roles the students will interact with and which ones they may not see as they work behind the scenes.
  • Speak about how, unlike television or film, you can hear and see the actors and they can hear and see you.
  • Talk to your students about directing their full focus to the performance and how this will help actor concentration.
  • Talk about the importance of appreciation and affirmation for the performers.
  • Speak about what happens when the performance begins and ends. The lights will dim and/or you might hear a voice over or sound. Explain that this is the audiences cue to focus their attention on the performance.

A note from the Directors

We’ve been lucky enough to tour all over the world with Windmill, specifically with work for early childhood audiences. For us, working on shows like Grug and Grug and the Rainbow allowed us to hone our craft as actors, but also develop a real love of interacting with children in the live space.

For Hiccup, we wanted to bring everything we loved about performing in theatre for young people into one show, while also throwing back to the type of entertainment that we loved as young people. In their frantic search for a hiccup cure, our cast of ridiculously loveable characters sing, they dance and fall in and out of calamity. A child’s imagination is a wonderful space to create in: the ability for children to become instantly immersed in something, to suspend disbelief and embrace the weird, wacky and wonderful, provided us with endless possibilities.

But beyond all of that, we really wanted to find a cure for the hiccups… fingers crossed!

Did you know?

Hiccups can be caused by eating too fast, drinking too fast, drinking fizzy drinks or chewing gum.

Meet the Characters

Eddie

Eddie is a city-dweller who is in desperate need of some rest. The hustle and bustle of the city keeps him up all night, so he’s headed out to the bush for some peace and quiet. He’s packed mozzie spray, his insect guide and his best friend: a stuffed teddy bear named Lucky. He’s very cautious, very loving and more than a little gullible.

Koala

Koala is very small, very cute and very troubled. He just can’t seem to get rid of this case of the hiccups, which has sent him spiralling into a misanthropic mood. His newfound friends have to do their damndest to try and cure his hiccups and make him smile before sunrise

Quokka

Quokka is cheeky, sly and desperate to get his hands on shiny things. They’re a natural born leader with a lot of bravado. But their gregarious and gruff exterior is just a facade for a soft, gentle and exceptionally loving interior. Loyalty and friendship means everything to Quokka… more than shiny things, even.

Emu

Emu is tall, batty and exceptionally inventive. With a passion for science and building wacky contraptions, emu is always on the hunt for something that will make his creations pop and sizzle (literally). Emu is a curious bird and loyal friend who will do anything he can to help a stranger.

Meet the Creative Team

Ellen Steele

Co-Creator/Writer/Director

Ellen Steele is a theatre maker and performer based in Adelaide, South Australia. She is a founding member of isthisyours?, an all-female collective committed to creating new and unconventional performance. Since their inception in 2007, isthisyours? have created five original full scale works, toured nationally and won multiple awards. Their latest production was a world-first reworking of David Williamson’s The Club (An All-Female, 3 Actor Version) as part of State Theatre Company SA’s 2019 season.

Ellen has toured extensively throughout Australia, Asia and North America with companies including Windmill, State Theatre Company SA, Vitalstatistix, Slingsby, Belvoir, The Border Project, Aphids and Patch.

Jude Henshall

Co-Creator/Writer/Director

Jude graduated with Honours from Flinders University with a Bachelor of Creative Arts in 2006. Since then, she has worked extensively for flagship, independent and experimental theatre companies across Australia and internationally.

Companies include Bell Shakespeare, Ontrorend Goed, State Theatre Company of SA, Windmill Theatre Co and Patch Theatre. Jude is an associate member of The Border Project and a founding member of isthisyours? Film and television credits include Sunshine and Oranges, The Swimming Lesson, Yuri Shima, Wire Through the Heart and Rainshadow.

Jonathon Oxlade

Designer

Jonathon has designed set and costumes for Queensland Theatre, LaBoite Theatre, isthisyours?, Aphids, Arena Theatre Company, Polyglot, The Real TV Project, Polytoxic, Men of Steel, State Theatre Company South Australia, Belvoir, Sydney Theatre Company, Melbourne Theatre Company, Terrapin Puppet Theatre, Vitalstatistix and Barking Gecko.

He is the resident designer at Windmill Theatre Company. He has won a Sydney Theatre Award for Best Costume Design for Mr Burns and an AACTA award for his work on the film, Girl Asleep. 

 

Ross McHenry

Composer

Ross McHenry is a multi-award winning composer, bass player and from Adelaide, South Australia. His original compositions encompass a broad range of influences including jazz, contemporary electronic and chamber music. Ross’ work reflects the unique and changing cultural landscape of Australian creative music and aims to explore the idea of modern Australian cultural identity within the context of an increasingly interconnected global musical landscape. Ross has performed extensively around Australia and the world at leading arts festivals and venues including Glastonbury, The Sydney Festival, The Adelaide Festival, WOMADelaide, the Falls Festival, Wellington International Jazz Festival and the Melbourne International Jazz Festival.

Chris Petridis

Lighting and Technical Designer

Chris is a lighting and technical designer. He completed his Technical Production course at the Adelaide Centre of the Arts. Since graduating, he has been working extensively and continuing to develop his experience across theatre, dance, and other live events both in Australia and overseas.

Chris has worked extensively with State Theatre Company South Australia, Australian Dance Theatre, Windmill Theatre Company, Theatre Republic, isthisyours?, Brink Productions and Tiny Bricks among many others.

 

 

Nathan O'Keefe

Actor

Nathan has worked extensively in theatre, both nationally and internationally. He has toured Asia, USA, and all across Australia, working for companies including Sydney Theatre Company, Melbourne Theatre Company, Windmill Theatre, State Theatre Company of South Australia, Griffin Theatre, Malthouse, Bell Shakespeare, Brink, Slingsby and Patch Theatre Company.

Nathan was a member of the State Theatre Company Actors Ensemble for 2017 and 2018.

Chiara Garbielli

Actor

Chiara (she/her) is a queer artist working on Wurundjeri and Kaurna land.

She works as a performer, writer, and poet. Chiara is currently a co-producer of Melbourne’s Slamalamadingdong and producing her own online series #thatswhatshesaidsunday. As an actor she was worked with State Theatre Company South Australia, Freerange Theatrix, Foul play and Act Now. She has been selected as the Adelaide City Library Poet in Residence and has performed at the Australian National Poetry Slam. She has recently been published in the anthology Spitting Teeth.

She performs in drag as Bruno Salsicce.

Tamara Rewse

Puppet Maker & Consultant

Tamara has worked in numerous areas of the performing arts since 1997 including as a Director, Devisor, Maker and Singer. She has toured both nationally and internationally. She has also worked as both a performer and puppeteer for numerous shows.

Her credits include Piccasso and his Dog (Lemony S), Mr Freezy (Arena Theatre Company), Grug, Grug and the Rainbow (Windmill Theatre Co), COOP (Black Hole Theatre) and Tangle, We Built this City, Paper Planet, Tangle Weave, Forest Feast (Polyglot Theatre). Tamara is also a member of Men of Steel and was involved in their self-titled debut work, Men of Steel as well as Hard Rubbish. Her skills include making props and puppets for film, television and theatre.

A cure?

What are your Hiccup home remedies? We've compiled ours below

Hiccup Cures

Hold your breath

Hold your breath for 30 seconds to keep the hiccups at bay. If 30 seconds isn’t enough (or is too much) we recommend trying to hold your breath for as long as you can.

Watch Now

Scream for 30 Seconds

We’ve read that if you scream continuously for 30 seconds it doesn’t give you a chance to hiccup and, thus, gives the hiccups the flick!

Watch Now

Get a big fright!

Getting shocked or surprised is equally as involuntary as a hiccup and, apparently, they act to cancel each other out. It helps to have a blue koala with this one.

Watch Now

Drink a glass of water

This one is very familiar. Some say to drink a glass of water upside down, others say to drink it without stopping, some say to do both at the same time. We’ve done all three, here.

Watch Now

Performance literacy and theatre etiquette

Students viewing live theatre can experience feelings of joy, sadness, anger, wonder and empathy. It can engage their imaginations and invite them to make meaning of their world and their place within it. They can consider new possibilities as they immerse themselves in familiar and not so familiar stories.

Watching theatre also helps students understand the language of the theatre. It is part of the holistic approach to developing student literacy. They learn to ‘read’ the work interpreting the gesture and movement of a performer; deconstructing the designers’ deliberate manipulation of colour, symbol and sound; and reflecting on the director’s and playwright’s intended meaning.

While viewing the show, students’ responses can be immediate as they laugh, cry, question and applaud. After the performance, it is also extremely valuable to provide opportunities for discussion, encouraging students to analyse and comprehend how these responses were evoked by the creatives through the manipulation of production elements and expressive skills.

Having a strong knowledge and understanding of theatre terminology will assist students with this process. Therefore, before coming to see Grug and the Rainbow with your students, explore the different roles involved in making a performance happen, from writing, directing and performing, to lighting, projection, set and costume design and construction.

Theatre Etiquette

Visiting the theatre is very exciting. There are some guidelines that students can follow regarding appropriate behaviour in the theatre and during the performance that will allow their visit to be even more memorable.  Prior to visiting the theatre prepare students for what they will experience as an audience member using the following questions:

Where can you sit?

  • An usher (front of house – FOH) will help you find your seat so you need to follow their directions.

How do you know when the performance begins?

  • The lights will dim and/or you might hear a voice-over or sound. That’s your cue that it has begun and it is time to settle and be quiet.

How is going to the theatre different to going to the movies or watching television in your loungeroom?

  • Something unique to theatre is that it is ‘live’ and the actors are real. You can hear and see the actors, and they can hear and see you.

What is the relationship between the audience and the performers?

  • As the actors can see and hear you, your responses to the performance show your appreciation to the actors. So, show your enjoyment!

Final points to remember:

  • turn off your mobile phone (even the vibration of a phone or lit screen is distracting);
  • avoid eating in the theatre and rustling paper;
  • cover coughs and sneezes;
  • don’t film or photograph the performance due to intellectual ownership.

Lets Learn

Activities that you can take straight into the classroom!

Early Years Learning Framework

Introduction

This unit includes activities and assessment linked to the Early Years Learning Framework. Teachers can choose to use individual activities to complement existing drama units or complete the entire unit of work with the children.

The learning activities can provide a structure to view and explore ‘Hiccup!’ with the children. They will provide opportunity for the children to generate class discussion and sharing of interpretations of the play.



Intended Pre-Show Outcomes

Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity:

  • Children feel safe, secure and supported
  • Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect
  • Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency
  • Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities

Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world

2.1 Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

2.4 Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

Outcome 4: Children are confident and involved learners

4.1 Children develop disposition for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

4.2 Children develop a range of skills and process such as problem solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, research and investigating

4.3 Children transfer and adopt what they have learned from one context to another

4.4 Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials

Outcome 5: Children are effective communicators

5.1 Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes

5.3 Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media



Before the show

Activity 1 - Getting rid of the hiccups

This unit includes activities and assessment linked to the Early Years Learning Framework. Teachers can choose to use individual activities to complement existing drama units or complete the entire unit of work with the children.

The learning activities can provide a structure to view and explore ‘Hiccup!’ with the children. They will provide opportunity for the children to generate class discussion and sharing of interpretations of the play.

  • Teacher invites children to sit in a circle.
  • Teachers asks children:
    • Who has ever had the hiccups?
    • What does it feel like to have the hiccups? How does your body move when you have the hiccups? What sounds does your body make when you have the hiccups?
    • Children take turns around the circle to show what their body does and what sound it makes when it hiccups.
    • How have you tried to get rid of the hiccups?
    • Did anyone give you a suggestion to get rid of them?
    • While still seated, teacher plays music with a distinct beat– like a hiccup.Can the children hear the ‘hiccup’ in the music? Can they tap out the rhythm?
    • Teacher invites children to stand and do a hiccup dance to the music. Children are invited to use movement and sound inspired by their original hiccup demonstrations to imitate having the hiccups.
    • Teacher asks children to sit down in the circle and asks them to describe how their bodies responded to the music to imitate having the hiccups.


Activity 2- We are going to the theatre!

  • Teachers explains to the children that they will be visiting the theatre to see a show called Hiccup by Windmill Theatre Company. Teacher shares from the study guide the synopsis of the play.
  • Teacher-led discussion on visiting the theatre asking the children:
  • Who has been to the theatre before?
  • What happens at the theatre?
  • What can a theatre look like?

Teacher explains that they are going to the Space Theatre at the Adelaide Festival Centre. Teacher asks the children:

    • How might we get to the theatre?
    • Who might you see at the theatre?
    • What role does the audience play at the theatre?


Activity 3 - Introducing Hiccup

  • Teacher explains the story of ‘Hiccup!’ will be told by actors and puppets. The actor will pretend to be other people, and the actors will also operate the puppets. The puppets will be Australian native animals.
  • Teachers asks the children, what the word, ‘native’ means?
  • Teacher asks children what native Australian animals they know.
  • Teacher has prepared small A5 photo cards of native Australian animals. For example, koala, quokka, emu, blue tongue lizard, (animals they will see in the show) and kangaroo, kookaburra, platypus, crocodile and red belly black snake.
  • Teacher divides the children into two groups. The two groups sit facing each other with a large space in between for a game of animal charades.
  • Teacher gives one group a photo card without the other group seeing the card. In the space between the groups, the children will act out the animal using sound and movement for the other group (the audience). The audience guesses the animal. The other group is then given a card and the process is repeated. The group switches between audience and performers as the game continues using the remaining cards.
  • At the end of the game the teacher displays the photo cards. Teacher has prepared name cards for each of the photo cards and researched scientific names for the animals, the Aboriginal name of the animal and the cThe name card is the animal’s Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal name.
    • Teacher points to each photo card and asks the children to identify the animal and asks a child to add the name card to the photo. Together the teacher and children say the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal name for the animal.
  • Teacher gives one group a photo card without the other group seeing the card. In the space between the groups, the children will act out the animal using sound and movement for the other group (the audience). The audience guesses the animal. The other group is then given a card and the process is repeated. The group switches between audience and performers as the game continues using the remaining cards.
  • At the end of the game the teacher displays the photo cards. Teacher has prepared name cards for each of the photo cards. On the name card is the animal’s  name (scientific and colloquial).
    • Teacher points to each photo card and asks the children to identify the animal and asks a child to add the name card to the photo. Together the teacher and children say the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal name for the animal.


Activity 4 - How are puppets made?

  • Teacher shows children the video of Tamara Rewse in her workshop making the puppets that will be used in ‘Hiccup!’. In the video Tamara/or an actor shows the mechanics of the puppet and how they are operated. The actor explains how they manage operating the puppets and playing their own characters. This gives the children an insight into what is happening backstage during the performance.
  • Using materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items, the teacher creates a native Australian animal puppet. For example, using an egg carton and draw on eyes for a crocodile; a stocking stuffed with newspaper for a snake. Teacher explains to the children how to operate the puppet:
    • using voice to add sound
    • using slight movements up and down to show the animal breathing
    • operator must keep their eyes on the puppet so to draw the audience’s focus to watch the puppet.
  • The children are to guess the animal created.
  • Children choose an animal from the ‘Introduction to ‘Hiccup!’’ activity.
    • Using materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items, children create their own puppet to depict the chosen animal.
    • Working in pairs or small groups, children create a short scene that tells the story of how one of the animals cannot get rid of their hiccups. The other animals suggest and show ways their hiccups could be cured.
    • Children can draw on the voice and movement work from the ‘Introduction to ‘Hiccup!’’ activity to create their puppet animal character. Teacher reminds children to keep their eyes on their puppet and to make the puppet breathe.
    • Teacher invites the children to share their puppet stories with the other children.
    • Teacher invites children share moments from the stories they particularly enjoyed.


After the show

Activity 1 - How do I get rid of the hiccups?

  • Teacher invites children to sit in a circle.
  • Teachers asks children to remember the hiccup activity they did before they went to see the performance. Were any of the suggestions Koala’s friends made about how to get rid of the hiccups like any of the children’s suggestions?
    • Teacher asks children to recall the animals from the play and what their suggestion were to help Koala get rid of the hiccups.
    • Using a simple costume piece to symbolise the character (for example: head band or grey beanie with cardboard ears attached), teacher enrols as Koala and sits on a block/chair in front of the children. Teacher uses voice, movement and facial expressions to convey role. Children are invited to ask how Koala felt when the friends provided suggestions but they did not work.
    • Teacher steps out of role and asks the children, ‘How have they felt when their hiccups have stayed for a while and nothing seems to get rid of them?’.


Activity 2 - What do I remember most about my visit to the theatre?

Teacher provides children with paper and colours for drawing:

      • Teacher asks children to draw on their paper:
        • with their eyes closed
        • with their less dominant hand
        • a continuous line without taking their colour off the paper
      • Teacher invites children to draw the performance they watched.
      • Teacher circulates amongst the students. Using open ended questions to draw multi-worded responses, the teacher converses with the children about their drawing. This is to support the children to think about the performance they have seen, to make connections and begin to shape opinions. It also signals to the children their perspectives are valued. Examples of the open ended questions include:
        • Who is…?
        • What is…?
        • Where do/is…?
        • How do you know?
        • I wonder what that person/character is thinking?
        • How do the people/animals in this picture feel?
        • If they could speak, what would this person/character say?
        • What title would you give your drawing?
      • Teacher creates a space in the room to display drawings. Teacher also hangs their drawing of the theatre visit. Children are invited to look at the drawings.
        • Teacher engages students in discussion of what they depicted in their drawings.
        • Did other children and the teacher depict the same thing or something different? Have the drawings triggered other memories from the visit?
      • Teacher makes copies of the drawing and encourages children to take their drawing home to share with their family and explain their experience of going to the theatre.


Activity 3 - If I had a tent, what would it be like?

  • Teachers asks children who has been camping and to describe their camping adventures.
  • Teachers asks children what equipment they might need when they go camping. Make a list.
  • Children find a space on the floor with room around them to move. Teachers asks children if they remember the tent that was in the performance. What did it look like? What do they think it was made from? What would it feel like? How warm would it be? (it gets pretty cold at night out in the Australian bush!). What would have been inside it?
  • Teachers explains that in their own special space the children are going to set up their own camp site and pitch their own tent. Teacher-led, children are invited to imagine they are out in the Australian bush on a trek by themselves. It is the end of the day and so they:
    • take off their heavy backpack
    • have a drink after a long day’s walk
    • work out where in their space would be a good spot for a tent – it needs to be level and free from any rocks or sticks
    • get their tent out of their backpack; What colour is it?
    • lay their tent out so it is smooth; What does is feel like?; line up the tent pegs (how many do we need?) Count them as a class.
    • Pitch their tent (explain to children they are experts at pitching tents; so while it does take some time and know how, they are incredibly competent at the task)
    • Stand back and admire their handywork
    • Take out their sleeping bag and other bits and pieces they like to put into their tent to make it feel warm, comfortable and just like home away from home
    • See another camper nearby and wave hello. You are so proud of your tent that you ask them if they would like to come and see how lovey your tent is. They invite you to see theirs. Say goodbye to your fellow camper and return to your campsite.
    • Look up to the sky. It is getting dark and you look up to the night sky – you can see millions of stars.
    • Decide after such a big day, it is time to get some sleep. You have had your dinner and now you crawl into your tent.
  • Teacher invites children to lie down in their space and close their eyes. Teacher takes children through the following visualisation very slowly (bush sounds can be played in the background and even dim or turn off the lights).
    • I want you to imagine you are lying down in your tent and it is now night time. You have just finished off cleaning up after your dinner and you have snuggled into your tent. You have made yourself comfortable and warm inside your little house. You have a little torch on, so the light is just soft in your tent. You have had a big day full of adventure and discovering. You think about some of the favourite things you did today. Maybe you discovered somewhere new to explore or saw an animal you had not seen before. Remember the different trees you saw; what their leaves felt and smelt like; how the water felt as you wadded through the creek when it was really hot right in the middle of the day. Your body is sore and tired and now it is time to rest. As you start to drift off to sleep you hear the night noises of the bush. Maybe you hear a frog, an owl, some insects, or a possum looking for some food. A distant koala might call. You let their sounds drift away and you gently fall off to sleep (let children lie quietly). And now it is time to start waking up, the sun is starting to rise, and the animals and birds are also getting ready for the day. You stretch and sit up ready for another day.
  • Teachers asks children to make a postcard to send to a friend or relative that captures the camping adventure they have just been on. The postcard might be a picture of their tent, or an animal they saw. Teachers asks children who will they send their postcard to. Teacher encourages children to use colour and texture in their picture. Teacher invites children to give their postcard to a friend in the class or take it home to share. Teacher can lead the children in setting up a bush post box in their classroom for children to post their postcards.


Activity 4 - Can we make our own theatre?

  • Teacher asks children would it be possible to create a theatre in the classroom?
  • Teachers asks children what they would need to create a theatre, recalling what they saw on their visit to the theatre and revisiting their gallery of drawings of their theatre visit. Children access objects from around the room to create the theatre. Teacher assists where required.
  • Teacher asks children what people they saw at the theatre from people visiting to people working there?
    • Children recall who they saw when they visited the theatre. Teacher leads children in a discussion about what these people’s roles were at the theatre from being an audience, to helping them find their seats, to operating the stage lights, to performing on stage (or even the bus driver who drove everyone to the theatre).
    • Teacher asks do any of the people require special props to show their role. For example, the actors needing a costume, the person in charge of ticketing needing a computer.
    • Children can take up these roles with improvised props in their created theatre.
  • Teacher makes a display of picture books about Australian animals. For example, ‘Koala Lou’ by Mem Fox; ‘Crow and The Waterhole’ by Ambelin Kwaymullina
  • Teacher reads a selection of stories to children. Children use stories to be inspired to play in their theatre creating stories and sharing with an audience.


Outcomes

Curriculum Links

Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity:

  • Children feel safe, secure and supported
  • Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect

Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world

2.1 Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

2.2 Children respond to diversity with respect

2.4 Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

 

Outcome 4: Children are confident and involved learners

4.1 Children develop disposition for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

4.2 Children develop a range of skills and process such as problem solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, research and investigating

4.3 Children transfer and adopt what they have learned from one context to another

4.4 Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials

Outcome 5: Children are effective communicators

5.1 Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes

5.2 Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts

5.3 Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media

5.4 Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern system work



Learning Activities: F-2

Introduction

Introduction to learning activities

This unit includes activities and assessment linked to The Arts: Drama, Australian Curriculum across Foundation to Year 2. Teachers can choose to use individual activities to complement existing drama units or complete the entire unit of work with their students.

The learning activities can provide a structure to view and explore Hiccup with your students. They will provide opportunity for students to explore the play resources independently as well as generate class discussion and sharing of interpretations of the play.



Before the show

Activity 1 - How do I get rid of the hiccups?

  • Teacher invites children to sit in a circle.
  • Teachers asks children:
  • Who has ever had the hiccups?
  • What does it feel like to have the hiccups? How does your body move when you have the hiccups? What sounds does your body make when you have the hiccups?
  • Children take turns around the circle to show what their body does and what sound it makes when it hiccups.
  • How have you tried to get rid of the hiccups?
  • Did anyone give you a suggestion to get rid of them?
  • While still seated, teacher plays music with a distinct beat– like a hiccup (can Ross provide an example or some music?). Can the children hear the ‘hiccup’ in the music? Can they tap out the rhythm?
  • Teacher invites children to stand and do a hiccup dance to the music. Children are invited to use movement and sound inspired by their original hiccup demonstrations to imitate having the hiccups.
  • Teacher asks children to sit down in the circle and asks them to describe how their bodies responded to the music to imitate having the hiccups.


Activity 2 - We are going to the theatre!

  • Teachers explains to the children that they will be visiting the theatre to see a show called Hiccup by Windmill Theatre Company. Teacher shares from the study guide the synopsis of the play.
  • Teacher-led discussion on visiting the theatre asking the children:
    • Have they ever seen (or been) in a theatre performance before?
    • Where they have seen this performance? (performances can occur in many different places).
    • to describe what happened in the performance – this can include what the story was about, and the technical aspects of the performance (e.g. lights, sound, the set).
    • Why do we go to the theatre?
  • Teacher explains that they are going to the Space Theatre at the Adelaide Festival Centre. Teacher asks the children:
    • How might we get to the theatre?
    • Who might you see at the theatre?
    • What role does the audience play at the theatre?


Activity 3 - Introducing Hiccup!

  • Teacher explains the story of ‘Hiccup!’ will be told by actors and puppets. The actor will pretend to be other people, and the actors will also operate the puppets. The puppets will be Australian native animals.
  • Teachers asks the children, what the word, ‘native’ means?
  • Teacher asks children what native Australian animals they know.
  • Teacher has prepared small A5 photo cards of native Australian animals. For example, koala, quokka, emu, blue tongue lizard, (animals they will see in the show) and kangaroo, kookaburra, platypus, crocodile and red belly black snake.
  • Teacher divides the children into two groups. The two groups sit facing each other with a large space in between for a game of animal charades.
  • Teacher gives one group a photo card without the other group seeing the card. In the space between the groups, the children will act out the animal using sound and movement for the other group (the audience). The audience guesses the animal. The other group is then given a card and the process is repeated. The group switches between audience and performers as the game continues using the remaining cards.
  • At the end of the game the teacher displays the photo cards. Teacher has prepared name cards for each of the photo cards. On the name card is the animal’s  name (scientific and colloquial).
    • Teacher points to each photo card and asks the children to identify the animal and asks a child to add the name card to the photo. Together the teacher and children say the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal name for the animal.


Activity 4 - How are the hiccup puppets made and operated?

  • Teacher shows children the video of Tamara Rewse in her workshop making the puppets that will be used in ‘Hiccup!’. In the video Tamara/or an actor shows the mechanics of the puppet and how they are operated. The actor explains how they manage operating the puppets and playing their own characters. This gives the children an insight into what is happening backstage during the performance.
  • Using materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items, the teacher creates a native animal puppet. For example, using an egg carton and draw on eyes for a crocodile; a stocking stuffed with newspaper for a snake. Teacher explains to the children how to operate the puppet:
    • using voice to add sound
    • using slight movements up and down to show the animal breathing
    • operator must keep their eyes on the puppet so to draw the audience’s focus to watch the puppet.
  • The children are to guess the animal created.
    • Children choose an animal from the ‘Introduction to ‘Hiccup!’’ activity.
    • Using materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items, children create their own puppet to depict the chosen animal.
    • Working in pairs or small groups, children create a short scene that tells the story of how one of the animals cannot get rid of their hiccups. The other animals suggest and show ways their hiccups could be cured. Teacher discusses with the children the narrative structure of the story – beginning, middle and end with a problem to be solved (getting rid of the hiccups).
    • Children rehearse their scenes and draw on the voice and movement work from the ‘Introduction to ‘Hiccup!’’ activity to create their puppet animal character. Teacher reminds children to keep their eyes on their puppet and to make the puppet breathe.
    • Teacher invites the children to share their puppet stories with the other children.

Teacher invites the children to share moments from the scenes where they particularly enjoyed the use of:

      • materials to create the animal puppet
      • and voice and movement to demonstrate the animal


Outcomes

Australian Curriculum – The Arts (Drama) F-2

Explore role and dramatic action in dramatic play, improvisation and process drama (ACADRM027)

Use voice, facial expression, movement and space to imagine and establish role and situation (ACADRM028)

Present drama that communicates ideas, including stories from their community, to an audience (ACADRM029)

Respond to drama and consider where and why people make drama, starting with Australian drama including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADRR030)



After the Show

Activity 1 - Invent a Hiccup Vanishing Amazing Invention

  • Teacher asks children if they remember the name of Emu’s invention to get rid of Koala’s hiccups (The ‘Hiccup Vanishing Amazing Invention’).
  • Working in pairs or small groups, teacher invites the children to create their own ‘Vanishing Amazing Invention’ to make for example, multiple sneezes, a fit of the giggles or the hiccups to vanish. Children use materials in the classroom to create their invention.
    • Children adopt the role of amazing inventors (can experiment with voice, movement and facial expression to convey their characters).
    • In role they present their invention to the class (audience). Children explain how their invention works either demonstrating on a group member of willing volunteer from the audience.
    • At the end of the presentation, questions are invited from the audience. Inventors must improvise their answers and maintain their roles.


Activity 2 - What do I remember about going to the theatre?

  • Teacher provides children with paper and colours for drawing:
    • Teacher asks children to draw on their paper:
      • with their eyes closed
      • with their less dominant hand
      • a continuous line without taking their colour off the paper
    • Teacher invites children to draw the performance they watched.
    • Teacher circulates amongst the students. Using open ended questions to draw multi-worded responses, the teacher converses with the children about their drawing. This is to support the children to think about the performance they have seen, to make connections and being to shape opinions. It also signals to the children their perspectives are valued. Examples of the open ended questions include:
      • Who is…?
      • What is…?
      • Where do/is…?
      • How do you know?
      • I wonder what that person/character is thinking?
      • How do the people/animals in this picture feel?
      • If they could speak, what would this person/character say?
      • Why do you think the creators of the play wanted to tell this story?
      • What title would you give your drawing?
    • Teacher creates a space in the room to display drawings. Teacher also hangs their drawing of the theatre visit. Children are invited to look at the drawings.
      • Teacher engages students in discussion of what they depicted in their drawings.
      • Did other children depict the same thing or something different? Have the drawings triggered other memories from the visit?
    • Teacher makes copies of the drawing and encourages children to take their drawing home to share with their family and explain their experience of going to the theatre.


Activity 3 - If I had a tent what would it look like

  • Teachers asks children who has been camping and to describe their camping adventures.
  • Teachers asks children what equipment they might need when they go camping. Make a list.
  • Children find a space on the floor with room around them to move. Teachers asks children if they remember the tent that was in the performance. What did it look like? What do they think it was made from? What would it feel like? How warm would it be? (it gets pretty cold at night out in the Australian bush!). What would have been inside it?
  • Teachers explains that in their own special space the children are going to set up their own camp site and pitch their own tent. Teacher-led, invite children to imagine they are out in the Australian bush on a trek by themselves. It is the end of the day and so they:
    • take off their heavy backpack
    • have a drink after a long day’s walk
    • work out where in their space would be a good spot for a tent – it needs to be level and free from any rocks or sticks
    • get their tent out of their backpack; What colour is it?
    • lay their tent out so it is smooth; What does is feel like?; line up the tent pegs (how many do we need?) Count them as a class.
    • Pitch their tent (explain to children they are experts at pitching tents; so while it does take some time and know how, they are incredibly competent at the task)
    • Stand back and admire their handywork
    • Take out their sleeping bag and other bits and pieces they like to put into their tent to make it feel warm, comfortable and just like home away from home
    • See another camper nearby and wave hello. You are so proud of your tent that you ask them if they would like to come and see how lovey your tent is. They invite you to see theirs. Say goodbye to your fellow camper and return to your campsite.
    • Look up to the sky. It is getting dark and you look up to the night sky – you can see millions of stars.
    • Decide after such a big day, it is time to get some sleep. You have had your dinner and now you crawl into your tent.
  • Teacher invites children to lie down in their space and close their eyes. Teacher takes children through the following visualisation very slowly (bush sounds can be played in the background and even dim or turn off the lights).
    • I want you to imagine you are lying down in your tent and it is now night time. You have just finished off cleaning up after your dinner and you have snuggled into your tent. You have made yourself comfortable and warm inside your little house. You have a little torch on, so the light is just soft in your tent. You have had a big day full of adventure and discovering. You think about some of the favourite things you did today. Maybe you discovered somewhere new to explore or saw an animal you had not seen before. Remember the different trees you saw; what their leaves felt and smelt like; how the water felt as you wadded through the creek when it was really hot right in the middle of the day. Your body is sore and tired and now it is time to rest. As you start to drift off to sleep you hear the night noises of the bush. Maybe you hear a frog, an owl, some insects, or a possum looking for some food. A distant koala might call. You let their sounds drift away and you gently fall off to sleep (let children lie quietly). And now it is time to start waking up, the sun is starting to rise, and the animals and birds are also getting ready for the day. You stretch and sit up ready for another day.
  • Teachers asks children to make a postcard to send to a friend or relative that captures the camping adventure they have just been on. The postcard might be a picture of their tent, or an animal they saw. Teachers asks children who will they send their postcard to. Teacher encourages children to use colour and texture in their picture. Teacher invites children to give their postcard to a friend in the class or take it home to share. Teacher can lead the children in setting up a bush post box in their classroom for children to post their postcards.


Activity 4 - Introduction to Dramatic Storytelling

  • Teacher makes a display of picture books about animals from different cultures. For example:
    • ‘Crow and The Waterhole’ by Ambelin Kwaymullina
    • ‘The Gift of Gold’ by Dorothy Kowen
    • ‘Koala Lou’ by Mem Fox
    • ‘Sera Learns to Fly’ by Vinitha Ramchandani and Nirzara Verulkar
    • ‘Wabi Sabi’ by Mark Reibstein.
  • Teacher reads a selection of stories to the children.
    • Before reading each story, teacher tells the children which country or culture the story originates.
    • Using a world map or globe, teacher invites the children to locate the country or culture. Children in the class who are from each country or culture are invited to share some information with the class.
  • Teacher hangs a large piece of butcher’s paper on a wall in the classroom. After each book is read:
    • teacher invites a selection of children to write the names of the animals on the paper and/or draw a simple picture.
    • Teacher asks children to stand in the space. Using voice, movement and facial expression, children act out the animals from the book.
    • Teacher discusses with children how they used their voice, movement and facial expression to convey the animal.
  • Once all the stories are read, teacher invites children to form small groups. Children use the stories to be inspired to create, rehearse and present a story to the class.
  • At the end of the performances, teacher ask the children to depict through words and/or drawings:
    • Which was your favourite performance?
    • What did you like best about this performance? Why?
    • What did this performance make you think about?
    • What did you feel when you watch this performance?


Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Australian Curriculum – The Arts (Drama) F-2

Explore role and dramatic action in dramatic play, improvisation and process drama (ACADRM027)

Use voice, facial expression, movement and space to imagine and establish role and situation (ACADRM028)

Present drama that communicates ideas, including stories from their community, to an audience (ACADRM029)

Respond to drama and consider where and why people make drama, starting with Australian drama including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACADRR030)



Learning Activities: Years 3-4

Introduction

This unit includes activities and assessment linked to The Arts: Drama, Australian Curriculum across Year 3 and 4. Teachers can choose to use individual activities to complement existing drama units or complete the entire unit of work with their students.

The learning activities can provide a structure to view and explore ‘Hiccup!’ with your students. They will provide opportunity for students to explore the play resources independently as well as generate class discussion and sharing of interpretations of the play.



Before the Show

Activity 1 - How do I get rid of the hiccups?

  • Teacher invites students to sit in a circle.
  • Teachers asks students:
    • Who has ever had the hiccups?
    • What does it feel like to have the hiccups? What does your body do?
    • How have you tried to get rid of them?
    • Did anyone give you a suggestion to get rid of them?
  • Teacher asks students to stand in the circle. Taking turns, using voice, gesture and movement students act out inventive ways to get rid of the hiccups. Other students in the group copy and repeat each suggestion.


Activity 2 - We are going to the theatre!

  • Teachers explains to the students that they will be visiting the theatre to see a show called ‘Hiccup!’ by Windmill Theatre Company. Teacher shares from the study guide the synopsis of the play.
  • Teacher-led discussion on visiting the theatre asking the students:
    • Have they ever seen (or been) in a theatre performance before?
    • Where they have seen this performance? (performances can occur in many different places).
    • to describe what happened in the performance – this can include what the story was about, and the technical aspects of the performance (e.g. lights, sound, the set).
    • Why do we go to the theatre?
  • Teacher explains that they are going to the Space Theatre at the Adelaide Festival Centre. Teacher asks the students:
  • How might we get to the theatre?
  • Who might you see at the theatre?
  • What role does the audience play at the theatre?


Activity 3 - Introduction to Hiccup

  • Teacher explains the story of ‘Hiccup!’ will be told by actors and puppets. The actor will pretend to be other people, and the actors will also operate the puppets. The puppets will be Australian native animals.
  • Teachers asks the children, what the word, ‘native’ means?
  • Teacher asks children what native Australian animals they know.
  • Teacher has prepared small A5 photo cards of native Australian animals. For example, koala, quokka, emu, blue tongue lizard, (animals they will see in the show) and kangaroo, kookaburra, platypus, crocodile and red belly black snake.
  • Teacher divides the children into two groups. The two groups sit facing each other with a large space in between for a game of animal charades.
  • Teacher gives one group a photo card without the other group seeing the card. In the space between the groups, the children will act out the animal using sound and movement for the other group (the audience). The audience guesses the animal. The other group is then given a card and the process is repeated. The group switches between audience and performers as the game continues using the remaining cards.
  • At the end of the game the teacher displays the photo cards. Teacher has prepared name cards for each of the photo cards. On the name card is the animal’s Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal name (not sure of terminology here).
    • Teacher points to each photo card and asks the children to identify the animal and asks a child to add the name card to the photo. Together the teacher and children say the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal name for the animal.


Activity 3 - How are puppets made?

  • Teacher shows children the video of Tamara Rewse in her workshop making the puppets that will be used in ‘Hiccup!’. In the video Tamara/or an actor shows the mechanics of the puppet and how they are operated. The actor explains how they manage operating the puppets and playing their own characters. This gives the children an insight into what is happening backstage during the performance.
  • Using materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items, the teacher creates a native Australian animal puppet. For example, using an egg carton and draw on eyes for a crocodile; a stocking stuffed with newspaper for a snake. Teacher explains to the children how to operate the puppet:
    • using voice to add sound
    • using slight movements up and down to show the animal breathing
    • operator must keep their eyes on the puppet so to draw the audience’s focus to watch the puppet.
  • The children are to guess the animal created.
  • Children choose an animal from the ‘Introduction to ‘Hiccup!’’ activity.
    • Using materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items, children create their own puppet to depict the chosen animal.
    • Working in pairs or small groups, children create a short scene that tells the story of how one of the animals cannot get rid of their hiccups. The other animals suggest and show ways their hiccups could be cured.
    • Children can draw on the voice and movement work from the ‘Introduction to ‘Hiccup!’’ activity to create their puppet animal character. Teacher reminds children to keep their eyes on their puppet and to make the puppet breathe.
    • Teacher invites the children to share their puppet stories with the other children.
    • Teacher invites children share moments from the stories they particularly enjoyed.


Activity 4 - Creating your own puppet performance

  • In their small groups, teacher invites students to choose one of the animal stories from the ‘Create’ learning experience. Students will devise, rehearse and present the story, following the narrative structure of the story.
    • Teachers asks students to draw on the Tamara’s approach to making puppets to make their own animal puppets to tell the story from their chosen book. Students are to make their puppets from materials sourced from the classroom or everyday discarded items.
    • Teacher:
      • reminds students to use voice (loudness/softness, pace and pitch) and movement to bring their puppet character to life. Teacher also encourages students to find a performance space in the room where they can operate their puppets and bring their story to life. Coloured fabric can be used as a backdrop.
      • explains to the children how to operate the puppet:
        • using voice to add sound
        • using slight movements up and down to show the animal breathing
        • operator must keep their eyes on the puppet so to draw the audience’s focus to watch the puppet.
      • Teacher asks students to present their performances to the class.
      • At the end of the performances, teacher ask the students to depict through words and/or drawings:
    • How have you used the ideas and features from the country/culture found in your chosen book in your own drama?
    • How well did you collaborate to make drama?
    • What worked best in the performance?


Outcomes

Australian Curriculum – The Arts (Drama) 3-4

Explore ideas and narrative structures through roles and situations and use empathy in their own improvisations and devised drama (ACADRM031).

Use voice, body, movement and language to sustain role and relationships and create dramatic action with a sense of time and place (ACADRM032).

Shape and perform dramatic action using narrative structures and tension in devised and scripted drama, including exploration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama (ACADRM033).

Identify intended purposes and meaning of drama, starting with Australian drama, including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, using the elements of drama to make comparisons (ACADRR034).



After the show

Activity 1 - How do I get rid of the Hiccups?

  • Teacher invites students to sit in a circle.
    • Teachers asks students to remember the hiccup activity they did before they went to see the performance. Were any of the suggestions Koala’s friends made about how to get rid of the hiccups like any of the students’ suggestions?
    • Teacher asks students to recall the animals from the play and what their suggestion were to help Koala get rid of the hiccups.
    • Using a simple costume piece to symbolise the character (for example: head band or grey beanie with cardboard ears attached), teacher enrols as Koala and sits on a block/chair in front of the students. Teacher uses voice (experimenting with the loudness/softness, pace and pitch of their voices), movement and facial expressions to convey role. Students are invited to ask how Koala felt when the friends provided suggestions but they did not work.
    • Teacher steps out of role and asks the students, ‘How have they felt when their hiccups have stayed for a while and nothing seems to get rid of them?’.
    • Teacher asks a student to volunteer to enrol as one of the characters from the play who provided Koala with a solution to constant hiccups. Teachers asks students to source an object from the classroom that the student can wear to symbolise the character. Like the teacher, the student sits on the block/chair and uses voice, movement and facial expression to step into role. The remaining students are invited to ask the character:
      • Why they wanted to help Koala with the hiccups?
      • How did they feel when their solution did not work?


Activity 2 - What do I remember most about my visit to the theatre?

  • Teacher provides students with paper and colours for drawing:
    • Teacher asks students to draw on their paper:
      • with their eyes closed
      • with their less dominant hand
      • a continuous line without taking their colour off the paper
    • Teacher invites students to draw their most memorable moment from the play. Students can add words to their drawing to describe what they have drawn.
    • Teacher circulates amongst the students. Using open ended questions to draw multi-worded responses, the teacher converses with the students about their drawing. This is to support the students to think about the performance they have seen, to make connections and being to shape opinions. It also signals to the students their perspectives are valued. Examples of the open ended questions include:
      • Who is…? How did they use their voice/movement/gestures to create their character?
      • What is…?
      • Where do/is…?
      • How do you know?
      • I wonder what that person/character is thinking?
      • How do the people/animals in this picture feel?
      • If they could speak, what would this person/character say?
      • Is there any tension in this moment of the play? How is the tension being created?
      • What part of the play did this moment happen?
      • What title would you give your drawing?
    • Teacher creates a space in the room to display drawings. Teacher also hangs their drawing of the theatre visit. Students are invited to look at the responses.
      • Teacher engages students in discussion of what they depicted in their drawings.
      • Did other students depict the same thing or something different? Have the drawings triggered other memories from the visit?
    • Teacher makes copies of the drawing and encourages students to take their drawing home to share with their family and explain their experience of going to the theatre.


Activity 3 - Exploring Tension in Drama

  • Teacher asks students to explain what tension is in Drama:
    • A feeling of something about to happen or conflict within or between characters
    • Tension can happen as a result of
      • relationships
      • problems/task
      • of a surprise
      • or a mystery.
    • Teacher asks students why this Element of Drama is used?:
      • To move the story forward
      • To increase audience engagement
    • Teacher asks students to identify where tension was evident in Hiccup
    • Teacher explains that the classroom is about to be transformed into outback Australia and the students are about to go on a camping adventure with a friend.
      • Teachers asks students who has been camping. Teachers asks students to describe their camping adventures.
      • Teachers asks students what equipment they might need when they go camping. Make a list.
    • Students find a camping partner and find a space on the floor with room around them to move and start the drama. Together the students decide:
      • their character names
      • how the characters know each other
      • how long have the characters known each other
      • why they have decided to go on a camping trip
      • Do they camp often or is this their first adventure?
    • Teachers explains that they will narrate the story of these characters on their camping trip. Teacher explains that the students will step into role but also listen to the narration so they know how the story will develop. Sometimes, the students will be asked to create parts of the story themselves and the teacher will ask them to perform these section of the story for the class.
    • Teacher invites the students to play with tension throughout the story. They are encouraged to keep an eye out to when they think tension might be able to be incorporated into the scene to make it more interesting.
    • Teacher asks students to in the space with their partner, to close their eyes.
      • Teacher counts to three and asks students to open their eyes, step into their character and imagine they are getting ready for their camping trip at one of the character’s houses.
      • Teacher asks students to improvise the scene with their partner. Students are to use voice (loudness/softness, pace and pitch), movement and gesture to create the scene where the characters are packing their backpacks.
      • At any stage through the improvisation, the teacher asks the class to freeze the scene and hold the moment.
      • Teacher, using ‘touch and talk’, will tap a pair on their shoulders and asks the students to continue their scene and the class out of role watch the scene as the audience.
      • Teacher then asks the students to freeze the scene, break from role, and asks the audience if tension was evident and if it was, how was it used to increase the audience’s engagement. For example, was it through a problem the characters were trying to solve, or was there conflict evident in the characters’ relationship? Teacher asks the students how did the performers use their voice, movement, facial expression, or gesture to show there was tension in the scene?
      • Teacher asks students to take up their previous frozen positions and, using ‘touch and talk’, teacher will invite another scene to come to life. Teacher freezes the scene, break role and invites the students to again respond to the tension used in the scene.
      • Once ‘touch and talk’ has been used once more, teacher explains that the characters are about to be transported to the outback. Teacher reminds students they are working independently to other pairs in the space.
        • The story picks up on the afternoon of the characters’ first day of their trek through the outback.
        • Teacher asks students to close their eyes, counts to three, students open their eyes and characters continue the trek.
        • As the characters walk through the outback (the space in the room), teacher invites the characters to stop if they hear a bird or animal, point out landmarks to their partner, touch and smell a leaf of a tree.
        • Teacher also encourages the students to use movement to show that the characters have been trekking all day. Tension might be starting to become evident in the scene as the characters walk. Perhaps the character is developing a blister on the heel of their foot, maybe they are hungry.
      • Teacher asks the characters to find a good campsite for the night. Teacher encourages students to show how the characters decide/not decide on a good campsite – perhaps tension is building?
      • Teacher asks characters to decide on a spot. The characters:
        • take off their heavy backpack
        • have a drink after a long day’s walk
        • pitch their tent (teacher uses ‘touch and talk’ process to show how the characters are managing this potentially tricky exercise; perhaps there is tension in these scenes as both characters attempt the task)
        • Take out their sleeping bag and other bits and pieces they like to put into their tent to make it feel warm, comfortable and just like home away from home.
        • Look up to the sky. It is getting dark and you look up to the night sky – you can see millions of stars. Teacher asks the characters to freeze. Teacher explains that the characters have had something to eat and decided that after such a big day, it is time to crawl into the tent, snuggle down into their sleeping bags (it can get cold at night in the outback) and get some well-deserved sleep. Teacher asks students to unfreeze and perform the scene.


Activity 4 - Creating Tension in Drama

  • Continuing on from the drama developed in the previous ‘Create’ learning experience, teacher then introduces the tension that one of the characters in the tent begins to, for example, sneeze constantly or snore loudly.
    • Teacher asks the students to step out of role. Teacher asks students to devise a scene that shows how the characters come up with different solutions to try and stop the problem. Students must consider how they use voice and movement, and place (what can they use in their tent or outside the tent in the environment) to create the tension in the scene and find a final solution.
    • Teacher invites students to present their scenes to the class as audience.
    • Teacher asks audience to respond to the performances:
      • What was the tension evident in the scene?
      • How did the characters use voice, movement and place to show the tension in the scene?
      • Which of the characters do you identify with?


Outcomes

Curriculum Links

The Arts: Drama

Explore ideas and narrative structures through roles and situations and use empathy in their own improvisations and devised drama (ACADRM031).

Use voice, body, movement and language to sustain role and relationships and create dramatic action with a sense of time and place (ACADRM032).

Shape and perform dramatic action using narrative structures and tension in devised and scripted drama, including exploration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander drama (ACADRM033).

Identify intended purposes and meaning of drama, starting with Australian drama, including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, using the elements of drama to make comparisons (ACADRR034).



Acknowledgements

Produced by Windmill Theatre Co. Developed and compiled by Drama Education Specialist Melissa Newton-Turner and Windmill Theatre Co.

The activities and resources contained in this document are designed for educators as the starting point for developing more comprehensive lessons for this work.

© Copyright protects this Education Resource. Except for purposes permitted by the Copyright Act, reproduction by whatever means is prohibited. However, limited photocopying for classroom use only is permitted by educational institutions.

This resource is proudly supported by the South Australian Department for Education and the Lang Foundation.

 

  •  Lang Foundation

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